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Newly qualified driver & trackday possible?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 PURPLE_2L_LX

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 09:12 PM

As a treat i thought pickup a cheap Fiesta or Focus and take her on a trackday as a treat for passing.

 

Get the need for speed out of the system in a safe place and what happens when you take it above

the level of experience.

 

Some cheap part worn chinese tyres on a rainy day for good measure :)

 

Midlands based so a few tracks.  But would it be risky or just a big no?

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

 


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#2 Spare Wheel

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 09:52 PM

I don't see any reason that it would be a big no, but you should bear in mind that on most trackdays they will give you a serious lecture about 'Do's and Don'ts' before going out, so you won't get to go out and drive like a complete asshat Corsa driver on amphetamines. With an attitude problem.

 

The part worn Chinese tyres might be taking it a bit far, though.



#3 PURPLE_2L_LX

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 11:15 PM

Its all about slow speed fun. Maybe the trackday guys are missing something?

 

Not everyone wants to do 150mph,  30mph on some skinny gripless chinese junk can be

as much fun.

 

What they need are some 1.4 or 1.6 focus's fitted with worn dampers and wheels/tyres from

a 2CV   :)

 

Ideally my idea was to be let out between serious track users.


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#4 ChirpyCat

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Posted 05 June 2015 - 07:55 AM

Hi Purple_2L_LX

 

Did you get your relative on a track day?  If so where, and how did it go?

 

Speaking from the point of view as both a Approved Driving Instructor, and an experienced track day driver, my first thought is that there is no barrier to a new driver doing a track-day.   On the down-side be prepared to be intimidated (well, don't let it intimiadate you tbh) by much faster traffic up your chuff.

 

I would be tempted to look for track-days that cater for new track drivers, they do exist.  

 

As for licence requirements I certainly know Silverstone have no limit on time held, so essentially you can drive their track-days the day you have passed your test!  (Expensive track-days though).

 

In all honesty, my advice to parents of younger drivers, is think about a skid course first.  This is a basic and essential driving skill that is needed both on track and on the road.  I think the benefits of doing a skid course early on far outweigh the benefits of a trackday.  In fact, the confidence a skid course will give a new driver will make any subsequent track day a much better experience, in that confidence will be higher.

 

I made my wife to a skid control course soon after she passed her test at 21.  This has saved her bacon twice on

the road, (once a very life threatening incident due to anothers stupid driving). It then led her into track-days, track experiences, becoming an ADI, and eventually a Championship winning race driver (noted for her ability in the wet). 

 

I thought the experiences came in the right order.  Hope this helps?


Tony

 

(Wondering my Ford is always broken!)


#5 PURPLE_2L_LX

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 12:30 AM

Sadly i didnt end up doing it.  She has not even driven since passing. Family

issues got in the way.

 

I keep saying are we car shopping this weekend then, But my terms are i buy

the car and she pays for the insurance makes her think not yet.

 

Should have bought her one right away, Its actually dearer now than it was

the day after she passed her test. (insurance that is)

 

£1350 the day after on a Daewoo Matiz, Now the same car is £1800 to insure.


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#6 ChirpyCat

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 10:51 AM

Taking an IAM at this stage will be of far more benefit and for life than trying to fumble the  way round a track..Walk first,then run.

 

An Iam will teach lots of different aspects of driving including how to get round bends.Its suprising how many drivers with years of experience just have no clue.

It will also give you discount on your insurance every year and bragging rights to carry in your pocket.

 

http://iam.org.uk/dr...-skill-for-life

 

Im not sure about the skid pan idea,the aim is to avoid skidding and if you do then your doing it wrong.The chances are by then, its already too late.

 

Totally agree with Mobile Diagnostics above.   IAM (or ROSPA - I am a ROSPA Gold) would be HUGELY beneficial, and the bit "experienced drivers having no clue" is so true.  IAM will hep with insurance, ROSPA (though equivalent) doesn't seem to be recognised as much by insurers - so be aware of that.

 

Yes, 100% aim is to avoid skidding - absolutely.  Skids are bad chappies.  

 

"and if you do then your doing it wrong."  Slightly disagree with that though, there is an outside chance you come across something wholly unexpected and unpredictable like a diesel spill or similar (It has happened to me on a motorway - big spill from lorry ahead - guy in front spun on it and ended up wrong direction in lane 2 causing chaos, I naturally braked, had a bit of a "tank slapper", recovered it, threaded through the carnage, with some opposite lock going on LOL, and stopped in the hard shoulder. Thus I became the prime witness to a 5 car shunt, and not a 6th victim). 

 

"The chances are by then, its already too late.".    A good portion of skids are recoverable if you know what you are doing.  See above! My guess is a lot of, even "experienced" drivers, would have ended up crashing in my situation.  (I do not profess to be a great driver at all, it is simply that I had fortunately taken the appropiate training for that very situation).

 

In this modern world of FWD cars I believe understeer to be a nefarious killer as it isn't always obvious, and it is "counter intuitive" to correct.  Worse is understeer followed by lift-off oversteer.  A skid course should teach these things.

 

Yes I 100% agree, avoidance is absolutely key and nearly all skids, or aquaplanes, are caused by human error.  IAM or ROSPA will teach you to stay out of this regime.  However, I do not feel there is any harm whatsover with being equipped with the knowledge and skill to deal with a skid if it does happen.  Answer - do both advanced and skid course (but IAM first - Mobile Diagnostics is 100% right on that score).

 

Still nothing to prevent her doing a trackday though, but yes, "run before walk" is the common expression that comes to mind.


Edited by ChirpyCat, 08 June 2015 - 11:01 AM.

Tony

 

(Wondering my Ford is always broken!)





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