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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I've just been told by my garage that one of the rear shocks on my '07 reg Galaxy Ghia needs to be replaced and that it costs £350 excl VAT just for the part, as it has a load compensating/levelling part attached to it - I paraphrased what the mechanic called it. I don't know much about this car's specification, but does anyone know if that is reasonable? I can't even find a shock absorber with load levelling on any parts website, and the most expensive shock absorber I've found is about £35. Alternatively, since the other side is showing signs of wear, can I change the load levelling type for normal ones, or will the on-board computer say no?
The price for just one shock is quite a shock!
Regards
 

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TrevorB BMW320 M Sport 2020 M Sport Pro Pack. Tech Pack (Head Up Display)
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I don't know Galaxy models. There appears to be lots of types. Put you VIN number into link below and it should, repeat should, only give you parts applicable to your vehicle.
Then put that shock part number into say E Bay and see if any shocks come up.
If you want to see chice of shocks don't put your VIN number in, just go straight to vehicle.
Best of luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know Galaxy models. There appears to be lots of types. Put you VIN number into link below and it should, repeat should, only give you parts applicable to your vehicle.
Then put that shock part number into say E Bay and see if any shocks come up.
If you want to see chice of shocks don't put your VIN number in, just go straight to vehicle.
Best of luck
Thanks Trebor but this has just got a bit more complicated. I shall have to replace the springs as well because the standard shocks don't work with SLS springs, and possibly also the spring seats below and above the springs as well:rolleyes:o_O
 

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If you have self levelling supsension then yes the shocks will be expensive.

If you decide to do away with those then you will need to change all the rear springs and shocks
because the self levelling springs will be weaker due to the shocks doing some of the work also.

Unsure on the spring seats being different, but you also need to be careful if the headlights etc are also
linked to the vehicle self levelling.

Swapping these things gets harder as the ECU may monitor these items. Again I cannot answer that on your vehicle
not something I have come across.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you have self levelling supsension then yes the shocks will be expensive.

If you decide to do away with those then you will need to change all the rear springs and shocks
because the self levelling springs will be weaker due to the shocks doing some of the work also.

Unsure on the spring seats being different, but you also need to be careful if the headlights etc are also
linked to the vehicle self levelling.

Swapping these things gets harder as the ECU may monitor these items. Again I cannot answer that on your vehicle
not something I have come across.
Hi Purple and thanks for your reply. Before I saw your reply I talked to a local Ford dealership and they confirmed that I would not have to swap the spring seats and that the springs are a straight swap from SLS to non-SLS, as are the shocks. So I ordered a set of Sachs shocks and springs from Autodoc. (The shocks are about a tenth of the price of the SLS version!). There don't seem to be any wires from the shock to the car/ECU although there is one from the SLS component - a smaller cylinder on the side of the shock - directly into the shock itself, so I'm hoping the ECU and headlights are not linked to or affected by the shocks. I'm wary about the headlight and ECU issue - I wondered if that would be a complication as so many things are computerised in modern cars - so I'll have to see and will update the forum once I find out.

Thanks to both of you for the advice. Watch this space...
 

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It was a similar thing with the MK3 Mondeo. Self levelling shocks were £300+ each.

A set of new standard springs and shocks were far cheaper than just one self levelling shock.
 

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Hi Purple and thanks for your reply. Before I saw your reply I talked to a local Ford dealership and they confirmed that I would not have to swap the spring seats and that the springs are a straight swap from SLS to non-SLS, as are the shocks. So I ordered a set of Sachs shocks and springs from Autodoc. (The shocks are about a tenth of the price of the SLS version!). There don't seem to be any wires from the shock to the car/ECU although there is one from the SLS component - a smaller cylinder on the side of the shock - directly into the shock itself, so I'm hoping the ECU and headlights are not linked to or affected by the shocks. I'm wary about the headlight and ECU issue - I wondered if that would be a complication as so many things are computerised in modern cars - so I'll have to see and will update the forum once I find out.

Thanks to both of you for the advice. Watch this space...
Hi Mate, I'm going through exactly the same situation with my S-Max, need both front shock absorbers replaced which will cost me 6 arms and 6 legs. Looking to go the route of replacing all 4 absorbers and springs, found a garage that believe they can do it but wont be able to get rid of the error message. Wondering if you've managed to do yours yet and what the outcome was. Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi A-M,
I didn't have any error messages (had long-standing ABS & ESP lights on but they were diagnosed as a faulty ABS sensor, so I have a new sensor ready to go in - although the warning lights may be interconnected with the shock problem, I suppose?) just a leaking pair of rear shocks and some squeaky/groinky noises. I've received new standard springs (slightly taller than the SLS ones) and new shocks (much slimmer and cheaper than the SLS ones). I discovered the shocks need new top bearings/mounts as the standard ones are different - pressed metal and much shallower than the beefy cast aluminum SLS ones. That should have been enough to do a straight swap, but I also discovered the driver's side rear top spring seat (holds the top of the spring in place on the car and contains the foam rubber bumpstop) was rusted through, as well as the same side rear lower control arm which is also the lower spring seat. The lhs rear top spring seat was also rusted through and both rear bumpstops were wearing out so I have ordered news parts to replace all those. Sadly I'm still waiting for some of the parts to come from Germany (despite ordering from a "British" parts supplier) so I haven't reassembled the car yet and am unable to see if the ABS/ESP lights go out.
I'll update this thread once I've complete the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've received all of the parts I required. The bump-stops seem to be different however - shorter than the originals but the same diameter so they do fit inside the upper spring seat recesses. I've tried to contact Ford to discuss if these are suitable for the non-SLS spring/shock conversion but their parts lookup computer system is down nationwide so they can't help me... just my luck😖. I'm waiting for a call-back. Very annoying as I wanted to assemble everything today. Since the new springs are a bit longer and, I believe stiffer than the old SLS ones, I assume the bump-stops can be shorter because the springs would have to compress more to reach bottom-out than the original SLS ones but I can't be sure yet. If anyone knows about this, please advise...
I'll update further when Ford gets back to me. Now I have to fabricate the 40mm diameter X 226mm long spacer which I understand is required when replacing the lower control arm so as to ensure the suspension is reassembled in the 'normal' position according to Haynes. I'm hoping a piece of plumbing waste pipe will suffice:unsure:.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Update: Ford just contacted me (Rates Ford, I spoke to a gentleman by the name of Wayne in the parts department who was very helpful indeed). The correct Galaxy bump-stop Engineering Part Number is 6G91-5K570-FBD, and its manufacturer part number is 1545 069 (the S-Max engineering part number is 6G91-5K570-FAD and its corresponding manufacturer part number is 1545 067). I don't know what's different as they look very similar on screen - apart from being a different colour on Rates Ford's ebay shop - but perhaps there is a slight difference in length or stiffness? (Wayne suggested that whatever the difference is, it might be to accommodate for the fact that the S-Max is intended to seat five usually with 7 occasionally, while the Galaxy needs to be able to accommodate 7 as a matter of course? Anyway, I ordered a set of two for my Galaxy which should arrive on Friday. Further updates to follow...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Another update. I began to reassemble the rear suspension on Friday when the bump-stops were delivered and all went well enough initially, though getting the bolt to pass through the holes in the trailing arm and new control arm necessitated the use of two trolley jacks to align the holes against the force of the spring - one to raise and hold the control arm into the trailing arm and the other to twist the control arm to align the bolt holes in each arm. This wasn't too much of a problem and the new lower control arm is now on the car along with its spring, top spring mount and bump stop, and the lower spring seat/anti-squeak rubber which I recovered and re-used from the old control arm.

However, there was a major problem with this conversion which I encountered at about 5:30pm on Friday afternoon - as is always the case it seems:rolleyes:. The last item that I tried to put back on the car was the new non-SLS shock absorber to complete the job on the left hand side of the car. The new top mounts fit the car and the shock attaches to the top mount as intended. However, the bottom of the shock absorber has an eye fitting through which the bolt passes to be tightened into a captive nut welded on the outside of the trailing arm. It turns out that the eye on the non-SLS shocks is smaller than that on the SLS shocks, so the old bolt does not pass through the new shock's eye. The bolt is exactly 2mm too large in diameter - the tip of the bolt starts to fit but the threads make the bolt just too large. A smaller bolt cannot be used because it will then be too small to be tightened into the captive nut, obviously.

I was about to give up and resort to spending an additional small fortune by buying a pair of SLS shocks after all, when I decided to just phone my local garage to ask their advice. The mechanic said that for only 2mm they might be able to enlarge the eye of the shock aborber lower fixing by drilling it out in their shop, depending on whether or not there is enough meat left in the eye's central metal sleeve to enable the job to be done. The only other option that I can see is to replace the trailing arms on both sides with those from a standard suspension car which has the smaller bolt and captive nut. This is a job I'd rather not have to do. In hindsight, perhaps I should have spent upwards of £700 for two new SLS shocks and be done with it. To be fair though, I would then probably not have discovered the corroded lower control arm and upper spring seats since those are not involved when replacing just the shocks, so those would have either gone unnoticed until they failed later, or if spotted now, would need to have been replaced as well, costing even more money on top of the horrendously expensive SLS shocks. As it is, and if I'm able to have the standard shock eyes drilled out safely, I shall still have spent only about as much as the price of one SLS shock and will have replaced all the other failing/aged rear suspension parts at the same time, which is not a bad thing. I hope the garage is able to do the drilling as I'll then be able to get the car back on the road.

When it comes time to replace the rear shocks again, I think I'll just sell a child and buy a pair of new SLS shocks and fit them along with the original springs which I'll keep in storage along with the SLS top shock absorber mountings which are unique to the SLS shocks. Luckily all the other parts that I've replaced are common between standard and SLS suspension setup, namely the top spring seats, lower control arm, bumpstops and the rubber buffers that fit between the springs and seats, so those parts were not wasted.

I'll update this thread once I've taken the shocks and bolt to the garage on Monday morning to see what can be done about it.
 

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Another update. I began to reassemble the rear suspension on Friday when the bump-stops were delivered and all went well enough initially, though getting the bolt to pass through the holes in the trailing arm and new control arm necessitated the use of two trolley jacks to align the holes against the force of the spring - one to raise and hold the control arm into the trailing arm and the other to twist the control arm to align the bolt holes in each arm. This wasn't too much of a problem and the new lower control arm is now on the car along with its spring, top spring mount and bump stop, and the lower spring seat/anti-squeak rubber which I recovered and re-used from the old control arm.

However, there was a major problem with this conversion which I encountered at about 5:30pm on Friday afternoon - as is always the case it seems:rolleyes:. The last item that I tried to put back on the car was the new non-SLS shock absorber to complete the job on the left hand side of the car. The new top mounts fit the car and the shock attaches to the top mount as intended. However, the bottom of the shock absorber has an eye fitting through which the bolt passes to be tightened into a captive nut welded on the outside of the trailing arm. It turns out that the eye on the non-SLS shocks is smaller than that on the SLS shocks, so the old bolt does not pass through the new shock's eye. The bolt is exactly 2mm too large in diameter - the tip of the bolt starts to fit but the threads make the bolt just too large. A smaller bolt cannot be used because it will then be too small to be tightened into the captive nut, obviously.

I was about to give up and resort to spending an additional small fortune by buying a pair of SLS shocks after all, when I decided to just phone my local garage to ask their advice. The mechanic said that for only 2mm they might be able to enlarge the eye of the shock aborber lower fixing by drilling it out in their shop, depending on whether or not there is enough meat left in the eye's central metal sleeve to enable the job to be done. The only other option that I can see is to replace the trailing arms on both sides with those from a standard suspension car which has the smaller bolt and captive nut. This is a job I'd rather not have to do. In hindsight, perhaps I should have spent upwards of £700 for two new SLS shocks and be done with it. To be fair though, I would then probably not have discovered the corroded lower control arm and upper spring seats since those are not involved when replacing just the shocks, so those would have either gone unnoticed until they failed later, or if spotted now, would need to have been replaced as well, costing even more money on top of the horrendously expensive SLS shocks. As it is, and if I'm able to have the standard shock eyes drilled out safely, I shall still have spent only about as much as the price of one SLS shock and will have replaced all the other failing/aged rear suspension parts at the same time, which is not a bad thing. I hope the garage is able to do the drilling as I'll then be able to get the car back on the road.

When it comes time to replace the rear shocks again, I think I'll just sell a child and buy a pair of new SLS shocks and fit them along with the original springs which I'll keep in storage along with the SLS top shock absorber mountings which are unique to the SLS shocks. Luckily all the other parts that I've replaced are common between standard and SLS suspension setup, namely the top spring seats, lower control arm, bumpstops and the rubber buffers that fit between the springs and seats, so those parts were not wasted.

I'll update this thread once I've taken the shocks and bolt to the garage on Monday morning to see what can be done about it.
Thanks very much for the updates Gen2. Sounds like a pretty big headache in the end of the day, and something way out of my league. I'm still waiting for the garage to let me know if he's willing to do it for me and at what cost but I'll definitely be showing him this info before going ahead with it. Looking forward to hearing whether you come right with the drilling or not! Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, the garage wasn't able to enlarge the eye hole as they don't have 16mm drill bits. I was about to buy a few drill bits and have a go myself when I found a local engineering company who did it for me for less than the cost of the drill bits.
I reassembled the car today - after shelling out another £130 to replace my trolley jack which packed up today - and, after jump-starting the now totally flat battery and finding a screw in a slowly deflating tyre (honestly, it's just one event after another) I took it for a test drive.
It seems to have cured the squeaky/groinky noises from the rear of the car and the ride doesn't seem to have suffered as far as I can tell - perhaps a little bit firmer, but as the MOT expired while I was awaiting parts, I couldn't drive it very far🙄.
I assume the SLS lower shock bolts are thicker, just like the top mounts are beefier, because Ford expects one to carry heavier loads with an SLS system?
The conversion is doable and not difficult if you are willing and able to enlarge the eye holes by 2mm.
If I'd known beforehand what is required to adapt the shocks, I'd probably still have done it because even with the £20 charged for the drilling, the total cost of standard shocks, springs and top shock mounts - i.e. the only parts you should need - the price is still enormously cheaper than the cost of a single SLS shock absorber.

I hope that this thread informs people of what to expect should you decide to do this kind of job.
P.S. Having replaced the left rear ABS wheel sensor, the warning lights on the dashboard are still illuminated. I've been told that re-programming after fitting a new sensor is not required and the lights should go out automatically, so if they don't it means something else is wrong. Does anyone know what else could cause it to be so?
 
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