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The BeaST
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104 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello again

Right just been told that my brake pipes are corroded (amber alert on mot), so thinking it was the flexi hose connectors , ive bought a set of black diamond braided hoses and a pressure bleeding kit with brakes spanners and dot5.1 fluid.

But looking at the quotes on the mot and looking at these forums it seems to be the actual metal pipe lines.

Now im well up for changing the brake lines and also the hoses, but ive seen that its a right pain to route the new lines on the same locations without taking tank and subframe out.

Ive read you can re route or cut out the pipe just after the corrosion and splice it with a new peice of piping with appropiate connections and flanging tool.

If any one has done this successfully can you advise, can you thread through original locations without taking the car apart or can you tell me where to re route and what to use to tie down the pipework and/or how to splice or even if this is a good idea?

Thank you for all help received.
 

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If you've never done it before, I'd get a garage to do it.

The rear pipes on the Mondeo do go over the tank. IIRC one side can be done without dropping the tank but the other can't.
 

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The BeaST
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cool, i was thinking of doing it myself due to learning quickly how to do things and its alot cheaper then getting a garage to do it down my way.
If i went the re route way (obviously) the pipes should not touch moving parts heated parts or prone to bumps and scratched etc.. How would u attach the new pipes and mayb to what (drill holes in chassis for clips?) cheers guys

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You can buy special clips mate. They're usually plastic, and the line clips In tightly so that nothing rubs.

As said, be extra cautious when routing.

You could always do one side yourself and get someone else to do the awkward side. That way you get to learn something new and maybe you can watch and see how they drop the tank etc to get at the others. Winner winner chicken dinner.

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I've done mine recently. I had to lower the tank to get to the service joints and the subframe had to be dropped for access. I took off the old pipes without bending them and used them as a pattern for the new lines. I fitted braided hoses whilst I was at it and pressure bled the system after flushing it with meths, Brakes are ace now! The only problem I had was with the braided hoses at the rear, they had a different gender connector, easily rectified as I'd bought more than enough connectors.
 

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Big Daddy
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How hard the job will be depends on what part of the brake pipe is corroded. On mine it was just the part that run around the tank. If you look up high behind the tank where the brake pipes reappear, you will see that there are convenient fittings where you can disconnect the brake pipe before it disappears above the subframe. So if your pipe is only corroded around the tank (normal place), you do not need to drop the subframe.

Finding a new route for the replacement pipework is not easy, i could not find a suitable route at all, so i routed my new bits of pipe back around the tank. With patience it is possible to thread the new pipe in without having to drop the tank, whilst still managing to use most of the original clips.

Siruncle has put a link into his post above to a thread where i explained a bit more about the job. I would recommend reading it because i explain what tools you need to do the job if your going to just replace the bad section of pipe. A pipe flaring tool that does not need to be vice mounted is a must, you will need that to make a new joint on the front part of the pipework - forward of the fuel tank. Otherwise you will have to run a new section all the way to the joints that are situated well up behind the gearbox just below the ABS unit. I looked at doing it that way, but it was going to be a very big headache trying to get to those joints. Much easier to just chop out the bad bit of pipe.

Also on that link i have posted a few images on the sort of joints you will have to make. Again, a good hand held flaring tool is a must, those joints are of course safety critical.

Good luck with whatever way you choose to do the job.
 

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The BeaST
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey, cheers for replys much appreciated, thankfully the test centre has told me its only a sand and reseal jobbie (surface rust) but ill double check when i do the braideds and hopefully do that at same time. Thank you again for all ya help.

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