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Dog's Taxi
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450 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am 53 and with all new cars from 2030 having to be electric i don't think i will ever have one myself.
My main worry is how safe the batteries and wiring will be after a repair to a crahed car.
Can they say 100% that there is no damage to the wiring or the batteries.
With a petrol or diesel car you can smell fuel if there is any damage to the fuel system.
But with electric car you can only tell once it has a short in the battery wiring.
Even damage to the batteries can only be seen once there removed checked and tested.
But that can still be hit and miss.
I only ever have diesel cars as diesel is harder to catch fire and burn.
What worries me are the back street cowboys and the home repairer.
Who would fix the car and sell it on without every thing being checked.
I know this happens now with petrol and diesel cars.
So how do you feel about this. should electric car be scrapped after a crash or only if they are classed as a cat "S" and just repair cat "N" cars with light panel damage.
There are videos already online with battery fires and they are harder to put out as can catch fire again if not done right.
How do owners who have electric cars feel about this, would you want it back after a crash.
Please put me in my place if you feel i am wrong, it may change my mind, if you tell me why.
 

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Mondeo MK5 Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
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I don't think repairs to the complex systems will be really practicable for the casual mechanics. The way to avoid backstreet repairs is the same as now and give the car you're buying a good going over or paying for an inspection by a reputable orginisation.

The real problem with electric cars is the hype surrounding them specifically that they're environmentally friendly. They are not the environmental damage they cause is overlooked because they are zero-emission. Then there's the fact that current production methods rely on rare earths for the batteries so current battery technology is not sustainable. The problems involved in installing a charging point at your home are overlooked. Are people that live in flats going to have to drape an extension lead out the windows to charge their cars? Solid-state batteries are hailed as being the future but when are they going to enter production?

To me, battery electric vehicles reminds me of the hype surrounding catalytic converters when they were introduced. The air coming out of your exhaust would be cleaner than the air going in. In all the hype surrounding cats the information that they needed to warm up first and that they produce more co2 than a non-cat engine until they hit that magic temperature.
 

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Megger
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2,465 Posts
I am a few years old and still more than happy with my Mk3 TDCI. For as long as diesel is available, I see next to no reason to get rid of it and certainly not go EV.

But I don't understand the logic. At our local garage, where there are six pumps, they have installed an EV charger. Assuming that the average fill and pay time is around 5 minutes. Six customers every 5 mins means potentially 36 customers every 30 minutes. During those same 30 mins, presumably only one EV can be given a small percentage of its required top-up.

So how the **** is this a good financial investment?
 

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I am a few years old and still more than happy with my Mk3 TDCI. For as long as diesel is available, I see next to no reason to get rid of it and certainly not go EV.

But I don't understand the logic. At our local garage, where there are six pumps, they have installed an EV charger. Assuming that the average fill and pay time is around 5 minutes. Six customers every 5 mins means potentially 36 customers every 30 minutes. During those same 30 mins, presumably only one EV can be given a small percentage of its required top-up.

So how the **** is this a good financial investment?
The majority of ev charging stations will not be on Garage forecourts, those on a forecourt will probably have a store and or coffee shop attached. Charge your car and spend £3 on a 20p coffee


They will be on public/private car parks and be "pay at pump" so require no staff and negligible overheads after installation.
 

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Megger
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2,465 Posts
Depends upon what is classed as the forecourt. In this case, it is next to the air pump. And yes, there is a 'shoplet' as part of the garage with basic packaged food and a Costa machine, but I don't see anyone staying 30 mins to get a basic charge. The financial logic does not compute in my mind.

If Shell want to loose money, so be it.
 

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Depends upon what is classed as the forecourt. In this case, it is next to the air pump. And yes, there is a 'shoplet' as part of the garage with basic packaged food and a Costa machine, but I don't see anyone staying 30 mins to get a basic charge. The financial logic does not compute in my mind.

If Shell want to loose money, so be it.
Like i said it's a convenience point and probably costs them next to nothing, the electricity supplier probably paid for the installation and may even pay them rent for the space?, it doesn't reduce the number of pumps.

As regards the waiting 30 minutes, "What choice do they have if they bought the stupid thing ;)"
 

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Big Megger
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3,094 Posts
Like all policies dreamt up by our politicians,things can change overnight. Where is all the extra electricity going to come from? I don't see any extra investment in additional power generation plants! What about those of us who don't have a convenient place to install a charger port? I think it will all come crashing down on the political parties when it dawns on them that it is not as simplistic as they make out.
 

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The transition to electric vehicles is speeding up and here Graeme Cooper, our Transport Decarbonisation Director, explains how the grid is ready to cope.


 

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Mosquito
Mondeo MK 3 2.2 TDCI Ghia X
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564 Posts
Graeme Cooper is a prime candidate for the nearest mental hospital, which I would recommend ASAP.

If he believes that all the worlds requirements for energy relies on some wind farms, then he is a loon.

The generation of electricity is not without risk, nuclear power stations, reliance on weather conditions, possible problems with the grid, eg. power cuts, strikes etc.

Our infrastructure relies on a constant, reliable and a consistent source of energy.

He states that no one drives more than 500 miles, but forgets that people fly rather more miles than that. How does he suggest that people still can ?
 

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Mondeo MK5 Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
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The part of that article that interested me was that Transport of ALL people and goods was 28% of emissions.

Maybe the focus should be more on the 72%?

Than demonizing the Car?
That is the entire point of the environmentalist rhetoric. For example, you'll hear them say it's fine for cyclists to use the road because they don't emit CO2 completely ignoring the fact that cyclists holding up vehicular traffic causes them to run inefficiently, therefore, creating more CO2. The same goes for traffic calming measures they cause more pollution by forcing cars to speed up and slow down. Despite the fact, numerous studies have proved such measures are ineffective. The emission controls on cars are ineffective. We all probably know someone that's removed the cat or dpf or has bypassed the EGR valve and they still pass the emissions test during the mot. That a car can still pass an emissions test with the control systems bypassed/removed shows that the controls are ineffective.

To bring things into perspective the UK only produces approximately 1% of global CO2 so the UK becoming carbon neutral will make very little if any difrence to global CO2.

That something has to be done is without question. The problem is it has to be done in a sustainable manner. Transport needs to be a combination of hybrid, alternate fuels and electric. Simple trying to switch transport from fosil fuels to relying on another finite source(rare earths needed for battery manufacture) is just sheer stupidity.

Fun fact nuculear power has the lowest death rate of any energy source. Meaning less deths per kilowatt hour.
 

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Mosquito
Mondeo MK 3 2.2 TDCI Ghia X
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564 Posts
Since 2000, the world has doubled its coal-fired power capacity to around 2,045 gigawatts (GW) after explosive growth in China and India. A further 200GW is being built and 300GW is planned.

Coal generates nearly 40% of the world’s electricity, close to its highest share in decades. And there are now 80 countries using coal power, up from 66 in 2000. Another 13 plan to join the club, notably Egypt and the United Arab Emirates, though this is down from 16 last year.

Above has been copied and pasted from carbonbrief.com

Taking Grumpy’s point of the UK producing approx. 1% of CO2, perhaps our mate Graeme should be concentrating his efforts elsewhere !
 

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Resident Wrestling Legend
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4,123 Posts
to answer your question about the feasibility of repairing crashed electric cars just look at tesla
if you crash one it's a parts car as tesla know it's been in a crash and they simply turn all the functions off unless it's repaired by them
have you tried to find a tesla service centre?
exactly
the issue is that most people want a cheap electric car, and tesla warranty their cars for 8 years and then once you've hit that anniversary date they just wave goodbye to you
a friend of mine sells them and everything they promise you is great, until it's out of warranty, you get a free supercharger hook up at your house too if you buy new
but when they catch fire they simply don't go out, this video shows special water tanks to put out electrical car fires so check this out

 
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