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Wheel Tire Rolling Wood Automotive tire


To do: needs angle iron to spread load on axle.
Liquid Drinkware Fluid Yellow Solution
Wood Road surface Tints and shades Triangle Concrete


Load bearing flat area for jack head and non load bearing locating lip.

One thing that could theoretically go wrong is if the jack is lowered quickly without engaging the prop.
Could maybe punch a hole in the body.

Main advantage is speed of use compared to jack stands.

I service our two diesel Mondeos as a hobby, being elderly it also serves as exercise.
With four jacks I can raise the whole car and rotate tyres cheaper than the gym.
I have also made a wheel dolly which I use to lift wheels of the studs. Will post a pic.
 

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Mk4.5 2011 2.0 TDCI Titanium X Estate, business edition.
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
This is all proper engineering! Fair play!

The Jack idea looks simple but I'll need more than one Jack!
 

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Big Megger
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The item is listed here
 

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The item is listed here
No EN1494:2000 + A1:2008 approval - not something I'd trust tbh.
 

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Makes you wonder how they patented identical items. The same idea has been around for years and adverts can be found in old motoring magazines.

Its nothing new, it may work in some situations, but may not be the best for everything. Thats how you end up with a garage full of different gadgets.
 

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AbingDan -

As you can see, there are not too many practical answers on this.

I use the designated jacking points for routine servicing, so far without issues.
I jack each side incrementally to minimise twisting of the body, and use jack pads and integral props.



The rear end CAN be lifted by a trolley jack under the subframe between the lower control arms, with a block of 2*4 wood, followed by placing jack stands
under the designated jacking points.
I am not certain the subframe can take the weight of the car without deforming and consequently changing the wheel alignment.

Ramps are your best bet otherwise, I'd say.

It depends on your motive, if you want to save money, or time, or hope to have the satisfaction of DIY :) at all costs.
 

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Mk4.5 2011 2.0 TDCI Titanium X Estate, business edition.
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
thanks Speedlimit...another "can of worms"... I do plan to do my own bits of DIY...I will also keep an eye out for some ramps!
 

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There's numerous places for jack stands. Always jack at the jacking points, but the jack stands can go on any solid members for subframe or suspension elements.

There's two large bolts a the front for the subframe that make an easy place to put them. At the rear just put one each side of the subframe.
 

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AbingDan -

I had a look underneath with a view to identifying likely places for jack stands.
On the estate at least it looks like over the bolt (or nut was it) that retains the trailing arm bushes might be an option. That would be on the inboard side where there is a member which also takes the load of the vehicle through the springs and to which a towbar is attached if fitted.
In any case two jacks would be needed at the designated jacking points so the car is level from left to right, before the stands could be placed without risk of slipping sideways.
Ideally the safety stands should have a specialized head to fit over the bolts.

Hope that helps, always use safety stands of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Thank you speedlimit...I'll take a look so I know what you're talking about (still learning); but rest assured I'd always use stands/support properly!

I think, now I have my stand rubber covers for the jacking points, I feel happy using stands at those points. However the issue then is where to actually jack...

Is the bottom seam robust enough to fit a jack (with rubber puck) AND axle stand next to it? Or is it literally only at the jacking point where the strength is?
 

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The designated jacking points have reinforcement
over a limited distance, not far enough to place safety stands as well.

Use two trolley jacks with pucks or similar, plus stands.

Release the hydraulic jacks so the weight is only on the stands,
and give it a shove either way to check stability.
You can gently back the hydraulic jacks up as backup.
 

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Clever Clauggs
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Be careful when shove testing for stability as when i did it my jacking lip/point bent,though it was a rewelded rear jacking point.
 
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