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Megger
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What ho one and all,

I know this topic has been handled before, but I am still very unclear on the best way to jack the car.

to the best of my understanding, it is on the raised seam behind the front wheels and likewise, in front to the rear. But X years ago, when I tried on the front seam, all I managed to do was bend the seam!

So I purchased two varieties of slotted pucks.

Pucks.jpg

The shallow slot of a total no-go as the seam just cuts into it and it already has a split. so I purchased the deeper one. Again, somewhat useless. When the weight is applied, it tries to open and is also splitting on the base of the slot. Additionally, the head of the trolley jack just seems to embed itself into the puck and does not give confidence. May be I need a wider diameter head on the jack?

Which then brings the question, where to position the puck? At the front, the main seam is red, the green seam prevents the puck being positioned there and the nuts is the same. Behind the nut, there seems to be only two seams, not three and if the slotted puck is positioned there, is the body sufficiently strong to take the weight (even when the slotted puck it trying to split open?)

FrontJack.jpg

At the rear, the yellow arrow is the outer sill, the red is inner. But the inner is not very wide and again, the slotted puck kinda slides off and is forced open.

RearJack.jpg

At the front, I usually use the sub-frame attachment bolt but if I want to remove the s-f, and the car is on the stands, where does one position the stands to take the weight?

Likewise, the rear, where I usually use the bolt head of the front mounting bracket. As I am considering renewing the tie bar, obviously, that cannot be used for the stand. Again, where is the best place to position them?

Toodle pip
 

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Clever Clauggs
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At the front the mechanic used the boxed section of the chassis just behind the subframe bracket bolt.
 

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Hiding under a Rock
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575 Posts
I use the sills as recommended in the owners handbook but i think that's for changing wheels only.

I jack up with a floor jack at the sill and it's solid and I put jackstands slightly forward/inboard or way up front in front of the radiator. At the rear I have a problem finding a place for jackstands but still jack up at the sill.

I don't use pucks but the jack has a shallow cross recess to locate the sill.
 

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Rekusu. I had the same kinda issue as you never knowing where to lift,, but what I did is buy 2 flat hockey pucks and 2 slotted ones. I cut the slotted ones in half (down the slot) so it sits on either side of the sill but doesn’t really touch the seam then I glued the slotted pieces onto the flat puck so it stops it for opening when jacking up,, kinda works but I also had to trim the puck so it misses my skirt and I cut bits out of the skirt area too to help positioning
 

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Megger
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2,246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I did find this video. I don't know the difference between a regular Mk3 TDCI and an ST, but seems to me that an ST does come with an extra skirt and a cut-out for the jacking point, something that my car does not have.
 

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Megger
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2,246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
These are the exact jacking locations Ford recommend for the knife edge seam on the sill.

attachicon.gif
85B3A905-9F41-4267-AF28-C48AD830F5DC.jpeg
Don't recall if it was me or came with the car but the n/s/f seam is folded. I have tried to straighten it, but it needs more oomph that I have available and I am not going to whack it with a sledge-hammer.
 

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Megger
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2,246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Rekusu. I had the same kinda issue as you never knowing where to lift,, but what I did is buy 2 flat hockey pucks and 2 slotted ones. I cut the slotted ones in half (down the slot) so it sits on either side of the sill but doesn't really touch the seam then I glued the slotted pieces onto the flat puck so it stops it for opening when jacking up,, kinda works but I also had to trim the puck so it misses my skirt and I cut bits out of the skirt area too to help positioning
Wondered about doing this myself. What did you use to glue the pucks together? I was thinking of screwing the two halves to the puck.

But having found many other threads on this topic, I think I will make a wooden seam slot thing to sit on top of the jack.
 

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Dash cams, catch 'em out :)
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13,002 Posts
I did find this video. I don't know the difference between a regular Mk3 TDCI and an ST, but seems to me that an ST does come with an extra skirt and a cut-out for the jacking point, something that my car does not have.
One difference Chazz's video does show is that while his jack would be good for a regular mk3 it wouldn't fit under the skirts of his 220 if the saddle was still attached to the jack :).
 

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Dash cams, catch 'em out :)
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I still have the knife edge tool I made from an old Ford jack, but tend to mostly use a wooden adapter on my jack these days.

Adaptor made from an old jack.

A24CE0A7-0893-4F4F-BB63-BC0439495EBB.jpeg
 

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Little Megger
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Clever Clauggs
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I need to have all four wheels off the ground as i change rear brakes and do the

Forscan brake bleed.

So will put axle stands on front boxed chassis section and bottle jack rear sill then

trolley jack other sill then look for some where like rear subframe for support.
 

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Megger
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2,246 Posts
I still have the knife edge tool I made from an old Ford jack, but tend to mostly use a wooden adapter on my jack these days.

Adaptor made from an old jack.

attachicon.gif
A24CE0A7-0893-4F4F-BB63-BC0439495EBB.jpeg
Looks good and another reason I could use a welder.

But I am still confused. If Ford recommend jacking on the cill, your adaptor is a saddle over the cill that takes the weight on the bodywork, either side of the cill. Is that area strong enough to take the weight at the front?

There is also another photo on the Baldrick thread where a length of wood is used under the doors to spread the load. Is that a way to go?
 

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Dash cams, catch 'em out :)
Joined
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13,002 Posts
I still have the knife edge tool I made from an old Ford jack, but tend to mostly use a wooden adapter on my jack these days.

Adaptor made from an old jack.

attachicon.gif
A24CE0A7-0893-4F4F-BB63-BC0439495EBB.jpeg
Looks good and another reason I could use a welder.

But I am still confused. If Ford recommend jacking on the cill, your adaptor is a saddle over the cill that takes the weight on the bodywork, either side of the cill. Is that area strong enough to take the weight at the front?

There is also another photo on the Baldrick thread where a length of wood is used under the doors to spread the load. Is that a way to go?
Baldrick's idea might be good for you as you don't have skirts, but for me there isn't much room next to the sill for blocks of wood.

As for whether the sills are strong enough………….I can't say, I've only tried having the car supported on the sills for a mere six months……….Maybe seven months would have killed it :)
 

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Rekusu. I had the same kinda issue as you never knowing where to lift,, but what I did is buy 2 flat hockey pucks and 2 slotted ones. I cut the slotted ones in half (down the slot) so it sits on either side of the sill but doesn't really touch the seam then I glued the slotted pieces onto the flat puck so it stops it for opening when jacking up,, kinda works but I also had to trim the puck so it misses my skirt and I cut bits out of the skirt area too to help positioning
Wondered about doing this myself. What did you use to glue the pucks together? I was thinking of screwing the two halves to the puck.

But having found many other threads on this topic, I think I will make a wooden seam slot thing to sit on top of the jack.
Tiger seal as that's the only thing I had at the time ,,, still stuck together although they have only been used a few times,, I did think about some kind of attachment like raynkar has done but not got round to attempting yet ????
 

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Megger
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2,246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Am in the process of making a wooden thing to fit over the seams for jacking but still don't really understand. Should the jacking point be on the seam itself because one was bent X years ago when using the seam?

The outer flat surface of the seam is the cill and that is just a pressed metal cover. The inner flat area is the floor pan, again, probably not strong enough for lifting. May be if the area is spread over both, all is OK, but the two areas are not the same 'depth.' So a slotting thing will take more pressure on the cill than the floor; so again, where is the best place to jack?

May be I am becoming paranoid; jacking is not so vital as I use a few places with nuts into the body, etc, but if I was to have the car on stands, where do those stand go for best and safest support. The seams?
 

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Clever Clauggs
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4,258 Posts
I managed to support the front on axle stands and trolley jacked nsr ,i bottled jacked osr and the previously repaired rusty jacking point gave way,the jacking lip bent so didn't get round to doing all four wheels off for forscan brake bleed, hope the bent jacking point doesn't fail mot as i'm trying for a no advisory pass.
If possible make a support puck twice as long for the rear,jack up put a stand next to it then when removing the jack put another stand in place of the jack.
 
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