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Aussie Mondy Fiddler
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Can't remember if you used the injectors from from the st220 but I would check to see if they are the same as the injectors fitted to the 2.5

The theory being that if the st220 used bigger injectors then whilst the engine size is bigger the fueling should be pretty close.

Its like if you fit 550cc injectors in place of 220cc stock injectors. Whilst they are open for the same period of time the new injectors will be pumping 2.5 times the amount of petrol needed.

Just food for thought
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #122 ·
Good call. This is the kind of thinking I've been using. It's a full ST220 engine, I'm not sure on the spec of the standard injectors for that lump, but everything from the engine back, is stock (as far as I know) that leaves me with ST220 injectors. The wiring near enough connected up to the old 2.5 loom without modification. Basically, it's running a full ST220 lump on the old 2.5 management. I'm hoping that this arrangement will release a few more ponies when it's remapped!

I did look at the 2.5 injectors compared with the 3.0 ones, and the electrical connectors were of a different fitting, and also the spacing on the injector rail was way out, so (from memory) it was near enough impossible to mix 'n' match. In fact thinking about it, at a cost of near £50, I had to buy a new injector loom from the bay that is E.
 

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Aussie Mondy Fiddler
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376 Posts
That means to me you should be about right for a base with fuelling spark will need mapping to suit etc, but you shouldn't cause any damage running as is,
 

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Mk3 newbie
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4,105 Posts
Bleedin' hell, I hadn't thought of this! Of course the ST220 injectors are much higher-flowing, so for a given duty cycle they're pushing much more fuel. Also, the cam profile is probably pretty similar between the 167bhp 2.5 and the ST220 engines. The only real difference is the secondary inlet valves benig tuned differently via the inlet manifolds, cam profile, head design and ECU mapping. In the 3.0 engine there's obviously none of that. I reckon they ditched it to save money. The Jag version of the engine is more complex, powerful and torquey (ie better).
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #125 ·
Not having the inclination to start getting involved in swapping in ST200 camshafts, I think the next logical step after everything you mentioned is remapping, as realistically it's the easiest thing to do with probably the highest gain. Just need to work out when I've got time off work during business hours for the remapping company.

In the meantime, whilst I was at Mother's, she mentioned a broken old vacuum cleaner in her garage that's destined for the tip. On the proviso that I dispose of the remains of said vacuum, she agreed to let me have this bit...
Tire Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber Road surface
Like a kid with a new toy, I used my spare one of these...
Automotive tire Road surface Bumper Fender Gas
The question being, how to mate the two together. There's not much room around the sides...
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system Gas
...but fortunately there is room underneath. Aiming for the red circle, if that isn't already obvious.
Automotive tire Hood Bumper Motor vehicle Automotive lighting
Out comes the holesaw. Luckily, I had one that was, close as makes no difference, the right size. (It has to happen once in a lifetime, it looks like my time is now!
)
Milling Bandsaws Jig grinder Machine tool Gas
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #126 ·
It quickly looked like this...
Kitchen appliance Wood Food Cooking Gas
The Vax engineers really did their homework on this one. It's like they knew that 15 years down the line when the vacuum no longer vacuums, some idiot was going to bodge it into an old Mondeo. It even came with a handy end on the hose with two little lugs that you press in to fit it. Once fitted the lugs expand again inside the airbox and give a tight fit. On the way...
Automotive fuel system Automotive tire Motor vehicle Coil Coil spring
...and not a tube of mastik in sight.
Automotive tire White Tire Motor vehicle Synthetic rubber Wood Composite material Flooring Building material Gas Automotive tire Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Bumper Gas
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #127 ·
Looking up from the floor the tube is near enough in the right place...
Motor vehicle Hood Automotive fuel system Automotive exterior Automotive design
Unfortunately, it isn't currently that practical. This is it fitted in place and 'ready to go'
"Your cold air feed's not getting enough 'ram' effect" I hear you cry!
Automotive parking light Car Land vehicle Vehicle Tire
OK. Take one Stanley knife, cut to length, and force round tube into square hole...
Automotive parking light Tire Grille Vehicle Automotive tire
I'm well happy! I've saved 50 quid on an ST200 airbox, it's still got both foglights, there's no boyracer holes in the bodywork, and I've killed a couple of hours!

(Whether or not it makes any difference, is obviously still under scutiny)
 

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Mk3 newbie
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4,105 Posts
I like it, and you could rev it up whilst your mum hoovers with that loose end (oh, wait, it's no longer loose..)
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #129 ·
...and you could rev it up whilst your mum hoovers with that loose end...
Nice one! Think for a short while, I was possibly the owner of the world's only V6 powered hoover!

In true vacuum testing fashion a la Michael McIntyre, I had to do it; I put my ear to the end of the tube whilst revving the engine and it did sound ace!
 
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Mk3 newbie
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Superb, I bet it did! I did the same when I had a PiperX Viper connected to a hose (a foglight feed jobby). If you put your hand over it and revved you were in danger of damaging the hand..
 

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Lazy but Loud
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1,933 Posts
I have ST200 airbox and had some spare hose so fitted the pipe that point down to the gearbox with the hose (secured with duck tape
) and then secured to my front bumper discreetly



deliberately did it to the mesh so that can catch any large things before they go into the airbox - does sound good
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #132 ·
Ahh! Duck tape, Nice choice, I see you're a bodge conossieur like myself. I used tie wraps to the subframe!


Here's to the 'discreet cold air feed club'
 

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Lazy but Loud
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1,933 Posts
when in doubt - bodge it

Mine didnt have airbox mounting brackets when I bought it so I improvised and screwed it in
 

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Cheers dude. I tend to be of the same school of thought. Unfortunately, the thing's probably going to help me lose my license, as the sound gets better the higher up the rev range, and by the time it's into 3rd, it's already surpassing the national speed limit. The next installment of this project will most likely find I've taken out a loan, and purchased my own stretch of private road, purely to arse about doing 0-60 runs all day!


It does seem to wander about under heavy braking which is annoying, as I've replaced the bottom arms and the track rod ends, and also had it tracked, so maybe it's down to tired dampers or even strut top mounts. The rear suspension components are completely unchecked, there's a minefield I'm not looking forward to...

Edit: Here's a thought, the front suspension doesn't really knock or vibrate, it just sometimes steers itself under braking and acceleration, could this be down to drop links? They're pretty old...
Hi mate, very good diary


If the front of the car is sorted suspension wise, have a look at the rear front trailing arm bushes. These arms are to provide stability under braking and the rear bush (the one that's actually fitted in the knuckle not the arm) always wears badly.
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #135 ·
Cheers dude for the heads up.


Time is, always, the thief of finishing stuff. Or should that be, finishing stuff is the thief of time? I'm as of yet, undecided on that quandary. Been spending most spare minutes on the Escort making some Mondeo seats fit by converting them to tilt mechanism and sorting the fuel tank so it has an inbuilt swirl pot.

I've a set of droplinks and rear ARB bushes to fit to the Mondy before I can get too critical of the running gear, but knowing the state of the 'MOT pass' front wishbone bushes that were on it, I hold out little hope for any at the rear being of serviceable quality. Looking to a couple days off during midweek so I can get the thing mapped correctly.
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Front droplinks installed and the car does seem better under braking and general handling, (although the torque steer rears its ugly head like an absolute animal if the road camber is anything less than neutral!) The problem now seems to be of the idle variety...
Having cleaned the IACV as per instruction from members on here, which made a slight improvement, the idle still struggles to find the ideal speed. Especially when started from cold, or, come to that, when hot after a run.

The average idle seems about right to me, but it hunts for a while, up and then down, between about 400-1500rpm and then back again,, repeatedly, gradually settling into the ideal. If you rev it, and ease off slowly, it usually is fine, but blip the throttle to about 2krpm and lift off immediately, and it's like the IACV can't quite catch it in time and it stalls. Here's a video, this is from cold...

I hold the throttle open at about 2k a couple of times and when I let go it manages to save itself both times, but when I blip it quite hard it's got no chance.
I've tried the IACV on the bench connected up to a battery and it does click away like a good'un as you make the contacts, I've also tried unplugging it whilst running and the car stalls immediately, but it's almost like the spring inside it is too weak to react quickly enough.

There's no 'Ford' stamp on the IACV so I'm guessing it's a previously replaced part using a motor factors' special. I've been around all the vacuum pipes and inlet joints I can get too with carb cleaner spray to try and find a leak but nothing seems to worry it.

What do we reckon, does this seem to point to the IACV?

I was hoping for a remap soon, but it seems less than prudent to buy time on the rollers if there's air getting in when it shouldn't?

As a side note, why does every component on the ST220 command a price that's double that of the 2.5, which in turn is double that of the 4cyl versions


Cheers for reading, any comments or advice welcomed.
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #138 ·
Yeah, it just goes to show, it's often the last thing you'd think of. That's why I'm here... I don't think mine's anything to do with the cable though, I've revved the engine from the throttle body and it still does it.
 

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Little Megger
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141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #139 ·
New IACV fitted after missing the 'next day delivery' twice due to being away a week after I'd ordered it, and the idle is now much healthy. Hopefully no more heel and toe coming up to junctions to prevent the thing from stalling.
 
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ST200 Limited Ghia X
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6,508 Posts
great news! so what niggles associated with fitting a 220 lump into a mk1 remain?

i have a question actually - when swapping out an engine, do you scratch paint etc and items graze each other on way in and out, or is it not as tight as i imgine it is?
 
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